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Massachusetts Coins
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NEW ENGLAND
The Massachusetts Bay Colony authorized the first metallic currency to be struck in 1652 containing 22 1/2 percent less silver than the coins made in England. Joseph Jenks, the first Iron founder, made the dies for the first coins at his Ironworks mill in Saugus, Mass. The Shilling, 6-pence and 3-pence were minted by John Hull in Boston who was paid one Shilling three-pence for every 20 shillings coined. 
EXACT REPLICAS
MA-1 NE Shilling 1652

$2.10

New England Shilling
New England Shilling

MA-1A NE-6Pence 1652

$1.90


New England 3 pence
New England 3 pence

MA-1B NE 3-Pence 1652

$1.50

New England 6 pence
New England 6 pence

PINE TREE SHILLING 1652
After the NE Shilling was discontinued they came up with what they called the “Tree Money”, first was the Willow Tree, than the Oak & finally the Pine Tree Shillings. Since the Mass. Bay Colony was not authorized to coin money, they minted for 30 years with the same date of 1652, which was an illusion to give the coins the appearance of having been struck during the confusion in England at that time.
The obverse has a pine tree in the middle of a beaded circle with MASATHVSETS . IN with a beaded circle around the edge. The reverse has 1652 XII in the center of a beaded circle with NEW ENGLAND: AN : DOM meaning the year of our Lord, and a beaded circle around the edge.
AN EXACT REPLICA
MA –2

$2.00

 

Pine Tree Shilling
Pine tree shilling

MA-2A Pine Tree 6-pence 1652

$1.10

MA-2B Pine Tree 3-pence 1652

$.90

 

   

PINE TREE COPPER PENNY
1776   

Paul Revere was the designer and engraver of this penny. The obverse has a pine tree with MASSACHUSETTS STATE around the edge. At the base of the tree are 1d (d is the British symbol for penny) and LM (Lawful Money). On the reverse is a seated Goddess of Liberty holding aloft the Phrygian cap, a symbol since Roman times of freedom from slavery and the pursuit of Liberty. There is a watchdog at Liberty’s feet which is a symbol of vigilance with the legend LIBERTY & VIRTUE 1776.
AN EXACT REPLICA MA-3

$3.00

Pine Tree Copper Pine Tree copper

MASSACHUSETTS CENT 1787
“TRANSPOSED ARROWS”

These coins along with the Mass. Half cent were made at Joshua Witherles mint located in his home at 1132 Washington St. in East Waltham. Most of the dies were made by Joseph Callender in 1787 & part of 1788. The mint was abandoned in 1789 in compliance with the new ratified Constitution. These coins were the first coins bearing the denomination CENT as established by Congress.
The obverse has an Indian with a bow & arrow with the words “COMMON WEALTH”.
The reverse has MASSACHUSETTS & an Eagle with Arrows in one talon which gives this coin the nickname, “TRANSPOSED ARROWS”, and an Olive Branch in the other with the word CENT on its chest.
AN EXACT REPLICA MA-4

$2.20

Massachusetts Cent
Massachusetts Cent

MASSACHUSETTS HALF CENT 1788
This coin was made at Joshua Witherles mint located in his home at 1132 Washington St. in East Waltham. Most of the dies were made by Joseph Callender in 1787 & part of 1788. The mint was abandoned in 1789 in compliance with the new ratified Constitution. These coins were the first coins bearing the denomination CENT as established by Congress.
The obverse has an Indian with a bow & arrow with the words “COMMON WEALTH”.
The reverse has MASSACHUSETTS & an Eagle with Arrows in one talon and an Olive Branch in the other with the words Half Cent on its chest.

MA-4A

$1.90


Massachusetts Half Cent
Massachusetts Half Cent

“JANUS HEAD” HALFPENNY 1776
Massachusetts had not minted any coins since Hull & Saunderson closed its mint in 1682.
Paul Revere was the engraver of this coin in 1776, which never reached circulation. An original coin was sold in 1979 for $40,000.00, which now would be worth a lot more. Some say this coin is named after the Mythical God, Janus who had 2 heads one looking towards the old year and one towards the New Year, the month of January is named after him. Or some say that it was meant for the Whigs & the Tories.
On the obverse it shows 3 heads looking forward, left & right with the STATE OF MASS ½ D. The reverse has a Seated Liberty with the legend GODDESS LIBERTY & 1776.

$1.90

Massachusetts Half Penny
Massachusetts Janus Half penny

OAK TREE 1652
This is the second in a series of “Tree Money” that John Hull coined from 1660 to 1668, and like the Willow Tree, they all bore the date 1652. Coining money was the prerogative of the King and the colonists had no right to strike their own coins. The 1652 date was a deception to give the coins the appearance of having been struck after Charles I had been beheaded and there was no king in England. In this way they could deny any illegality after the monarchy was reestablished. The Oak Tree series was an improvement on its predecessors, the images being much sharper and bolder. They were also turned out in far larger quantities than the previous Massachusetts coins. They were struck in denominations of 6-pence, 3-pence and 2-pence. 
AN EXACT REPLICA MA-6

$1.90

Oak Tree Shilling
Oak tree shilling

WILLOW TREE
The colonists of Massachusetts were in need of coinage, so the Massachusetts Bay Colony opened up an illegal mint in Boston in 1652. Joseph Jenks was hired to make the dies at his iron mill in Saugus. John Hull, a goldsmith, was hired as mint master. Since people were “clipping” silver off the edges of shilling coins, then trying to pass them off for full value, the General Court in October of 1652 directed that all coins have a double ring on either side with the inscription “IN · MASATHUSETS.” A tree was in the center of the obverse, and “NEW ENGLAND” and “AN · DOM” (the year of our Lord) on the reverse. Even though this coin was minted in 1653-1660, all the coins were struck with the year 1652. Coining money was the prerogative of the King and the colonists had no right to strike their own coins, so the 1652 date was a deception to give the coins the appearance of having been struck after Charles I had been beheaded and there was no king in England. In this way they could deny any illegality when the monarchy was reestablished.
AN EXACT REPLICA MA-7

$1.90

Willow Tree shilling
Willow tree shilling back

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